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Completion of New Bridge in Québec

  • Friday, 16th November 2001
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Construction has been completed of a new bridge (Wotton Bridge) in the Province of Québec using both GFRP and CFRP bars as reinforcement for the deck slab.

The construction of the bridge started on August 2001 and the bridge was opened for traffic on October 2001. The bridge is located in the Municipality of Wotton, Quebec. The bridge is a slab-girder type with four main girders simply supported over a span of 30.60 m. The deck is a 200.mm thickness concrete slab continuous over three spans of 2.65 m each. The deck has an overhang of 1.15 m on each side. Standard AASHTO Pre-stressed concrete beams were used as main girders. Half of the bridge, including concrete slab, bridge barriers and sidewalks, was reinforced with sand-coated FRP ISOROD bars (Pultrall Inc., Thetford Mines, Quebec). Glass FRP bars (No.5 – 15.9 mm) were used in all directions (transverse and longitudinal) except in the short direction at the bottom where carbon FRP bars (No.3 – 9.5 mm) were used. The other half of the bridge was reinforced with steel.

The bridge is well-instrumented at critical locations for internal temperature and strain data collection using fiber optic sensors (FOS). A total of 32 and 6 FOS and 2 thermocouples were used to monitor strains in the reinforcing bars and in concrete, and temperature changes, respectively. In addition, 12 FOS were installed on the surface of the concrete girders to measure strains.


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