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Airship RIBS Benefit from Lightweight Composites

Airship RIBS Benefit from Lightweight Composites

  • Tuesday, 8th August 2017
  • 0 comments
  • Reading time: about 2 minutes

Airship RIBs combine the proven advantages of rigid inflatable boats, composite technology featuring Diab foam core material and a stepped hull design to create a quiet, safe and dry boat ride in all open water conditions.

Airship RIBs were the idea of three veterans from the offshore power boat racing circuit. Incorporating their experience and extensive knowledge into all of the Airship boats, Jim Dyke, Steve Neeley and Dominic Visconsi, Jr. continue to oversee the construction of the Airship boats on the shore of Lake Erie in Ohio, US. 

Suitable for recreational fishing, diving and family fun, as well as for marine, coastguard and maritime law enforcement, Airships offer the stable ride and simplified maintenance associated with a RIB, but the company has taken the construction one step further. With the use of innovative hull design and the latest lamination technology, Airship RIBs are said to be exceptionally strong, lightweight, extremely manoeuvrable and virtually indestructible. This is made possible with the use of moisture-resistant Diab foam coring. The hull and deck are vacuum infused with vinyl ester resin, a method that eliminates voids and creates a superior resin-to-glass ratio. 

The newest addition to the company’s series is the Airship RIB 330. With an overall length of 10 m and a maximum horsepower rating of 800, the boat combines style, performance, sea keeping ability and excellent operational economy. Airship RIB 330 is a completely new design featuring a 25° deadrise and twin stepped hull. It was constructed using vacuum infusion, incorporating Diab foam core and vinyl ester resin. This method produces a very lightweight hull and deck with an incredibly strong composite structure. The lightweight allows for greater speed, even with reduced power. During testing and sea trials of the 330, it was possible to plane the boat and maintain a 25 knot cruising speed with only one of its twin engines in operation.


Image provided by Diab


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