NetComposites

Connecting you to the composites industry

Advertisement

Composites Industry News

News for June 2010


Replicating Nature's Design Principles to Create Customized Nanofabrics

4th June 2010 0 comments

Bioengineers at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a new technology that may ultimately be used to make nanometer-thick fabrics that are both strong and extremely elastic. The key breakthrough came in the development of a matrix that can assemble itself through interaction with a thermosensitive surface. The protein composition of that matrix can be customized to generate specific properties, and the nanofabric can then be lifted off as a sheet by altering temperature. “”To date it has been very difficult to replicate this extracellular matrix using manmade materials,”” said Adam W. Feinberg, a postdoctoral fellow who is lead author of “”Surface-Initiated Assembly of Protein Nanofabrics,”” which appears in the advance on-line publication of Nano Letters. “”But we thought if cells can build this matrix at the surface of their membranes, maybe we can build it ourselves on a surface too. We were thrilled to see that we could,”” Feinberg said. High-performance textiles are the main application for this technology. By altering the type of protein used in the matrix, researchers can manipulate thread count, fibre orientation, and other properties to create fabrics with extraordinary properties. Coauthor Kit Parker is a core faculty member of the Wyss Institute, the Thomas D. Cabot Associate Professor of Applied Science and associate professor of bioengineering at SEAS, and a Principal Faculty member of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute. In the area of tissue regeneration, their technology, which is termed protein nanofabrics, represents a significant step forward. Current methods for regenerating tissue typically involve using synthetic polymers to create a scaffolding. But this approach can cause negative side effects as the polymers degrade. By contrast, nanofabrics are made from the same proteins as normal tissue, and thus the body can degrade them with no ill effects once they are no longer needed. Initial results have produced strands of heart muscle similar to the papillary muscle, which may lead to new strategies for repair and regeneration throughout the heart. “”With nanofabrics, we can control thread count, orientation, and composition, and that capability allows us to create novel tissue engineering scaffolds that direct regeneration,”” said Parker. “”It also enables us to exploit the nanoscale properties of these proteins in new ways beyond medical applications. There are a broad range of applications for this technology using natural, or designer, synthetic proteins.”” The research is part of a larger program in Nanotextiles at the Wyss Institute and SEAS. The researchers acknowledge the support of Harvard’s Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center at Harvard, Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, the Harvard Center for Nanoscale Systems, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and the Wyss Institute.

Read more


Carbon Fibre Ultem Resin for Aircraft Interior Parts

4th June 2010 0 comments

Sabic Innovative Plastics has created a new high-performance compound based on aerospace carbon fibre technology coupled with Ultem polyetherimide (PEI) resin, supporting aerospace component weight reduction for both fuel and systems cost savings.

Read more


Applied NanoStructured Solutions and Owens Corning to Develop Next-Generation Composites

4th June 2010 0 comments

Applied NanoStructured Solutions and Owens Corning have signed a joint development agreement to support the commercialization of carbon-enhanced reinforcements. Under the agreement, the companies plan to combine the carbon infusion technology of ANS (a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin) with Owens Corning’s reinforcements expertise to create a family of next-generation composite materials. The companies expect the carbon-enhanced reinforcements to be scalable to meet the demands of large-volume applications and provide mechanical properties with customizable electrical and thermal conductivity. “”Joining together with Owens Corning is a natural next step as we look to scale up our production capabilities,”” said Jeff Napoliello, president of ANS. “”We expect that this agreement will permit us to shorten the development time to produce customizable material attributes for commercial and defense applications.”” “”This agreement builds on key strengths of both companies to drive the speed and efficiency in bringing new materials to market,”” said Chuck Dana, president of the Owens Corning Composite Solutions Business. “”Potential applications range from wind turbines for renewable energy to protective packaging for electronics to composite armour for defence applications.””

Read more


Hexcel Has Positive Outlook for Growth

4th June 2010 0 comments

Hexcel’s outlook for the future includes double digit growth from the second half of 2010 through to 2013.

Read more


Boeing and Canadian Industry Partners Launch Composites Consortium

4th June 2010 0 comments

Boeing and Canadian industry partners have launched a new research and development consortium aimed at strengthening Canada’s competitive position in the manufacturing of advanced composite materials for aerospace and other industries.

Read more


Government of Canada Grants Funding to the Federation of Plastics and Alliances Composites

4th June 2010 0 comments

The Federation of Plastics and Alliances Composites (FEPAC) will receive $130,456 under the Business and Regional Growth program to develop intervention methods for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) under its jurisdiction. FEPAC has developed a major program, IMAC Plastics-Composites, which is aimed at helping SMEs smoothly transition to enhanced performance and sustained growth. Initially, some 40 firms will participate in this program, which consists of four phases—preparation, pilot, validation and deployment—and in which FEPAC is investing $121,900. In practical terms, FEPAC guides its member firms in their undertakings and helps them redefine their business plans and commercialization strategies, which will influence their choices in terms of investments, technologies and training activities and make them aware of the value of placing greater importance on research and development. “”Canada Economic Development considers it essential to lend its financial support to such a strategic sector as the one that the Federation of Plastics and Alliances Composites represents. Thanks to the work of this trade association, which supports business leaders and provides them with innovative management tools, SMEs become more competitive in their respective markets, at both the domestic and the international level. It is so that our companies may continue to prosper that we have chosen to support an organization that contributes to the economic growth and development of Quebec,”” explained the Honourable Denis Lebel, Minister of State for Canada Economic Development. FEPAC, an employer/trade association, comprises more than 180 enterprises in the Quebec plastics and composites industries. Its mission is to facilitate networking and, ultimately, joint projects.

Read more


Improved Crystic Intumescent Fire Protection from Scott Bader

4th June 2010 0 comments

The new Crystic Fireguard 75PA Excel intumescent fire protection topcoat is a product upgrade of the long established Crystic Fireguard 75PA, reformulated by Scott Bader’s R&D team to offer better FR properties and handling.

Read more


University of Dayton Research Institute Receives $3 million for Nanocomposite Research

4th June 2010 0 comments

A $3 million Ohio Third Frontier award to the University of Dayton Research Institute will fund the scale-up and production of a new nanomaterial that will allow composites to multitask Suggested application areas are a wind turbine tower that can de-ice its own blades in winter or store energy to release on a calm day, powering a grid even when its blades are not moving; or a military vehicle whose armour can serve as a battery, powering some of the vehicle’s electrical components. Nicknamed “”fuzzy fibre”” by its inventor at the University of Dayton Research Institute, Nano Adaptive Hybrid Fabric (NAHF-XTM) is a tailored nanomaterial that he says is capable of being produced in sizes and quantities large enough to make it affordable and viable for large-scale commercial use. When incorporated into resins, the fibres enable composites to be tailored for electrical and thermal conductivity, chemical and biological sensing, energy storage and conversion, thermal management and other properties. “”This is going to disrupt the way we think about materials,”” said NAHF-XTM inventor Khalid Lafdi, group leader for carbon materials at the Research Institute. “”From now on, instead of thinking ‘mono,’ we will think ‘multi’ – multiscale, multifunctional, multitasking.”” Lafdi added that, aside from serving simply as structural material, composites made with fuzzy fiber can work as batteries, sensors, heaters, supercapacitors, structural health monitors and other systems whose operations are normally performed by additional components. “”By manufacturing structural material that can serve multiple functions, fewer parts are needed for any given application, which means reduced cost, lighter weight and greater efficiency,”” Lafdi said. “”Everybody is growing carbon nanotubes on substrates,”” Lafdi said. “”We’re the only people who are producing them on a large-scale and continuous process, and not just in batches. This means we can produce the material at a low cost, and it also means we can produce pieces big enough to cover an aircraft.”” Lafdi and his team have been producing 500 feet of 12-inch-wide fabric per day at a pilot plant in the Research Institute’s Shroyer Park Center. The University of Dayton Research Institute and Ohio collaborators Goodrich, Owens Corning and Renegade Materials will match the Third Frontier award, announced May 26 in Columbus, to fund the creation and equipment of a full-scale production facility for the hybrid fabric. The new facility, to be located within Dayton’s Aerospace Hub, will be equipped to produce 60-inch-wide fabric. Goodrich expects to apply the technology in the marketplace first for commercial aerospace applications. The NAHF-XTM technology was pioneered and perfected over seven years with funding from the Air Force, Army, aerospace industry and Third Frontier, said Brian Rice, University of Dayton Research Institute division head for multi-scale composites and polymers. After successfully controlling growth of carbon nanotubes on individual carbon fibers, researchers accomplished the same on a type of carbon-fiber yarn and eventually on engineered textiles. The breakthrough was in overcoming issues of uniformity and precisely controlling growth of the nanotubes, Rice said. “”Various industries have been replacing metals with composites in structures and components because of their lighter weight and durability. But in doing so, electrical and thermal conductivity inherent to metals is lost. By growing nanotubes on carbon fibers used in composites in a very specific manner, those properties are built back in and the composites also can be tailored for specialized mechanical properties.”” Rice said the hybrid fabric production facility will serve as a cornerstone for Ohio’s Aerospace Hub in Dayton by helping to attract and connect new and existing businesses related to aerospace, sensing technologies and advanced materials. One targeted application will be unmanned aerial vehicles weighing less than 150 pounds. “”We’d like to begin making ‘smart’ structural materials for UAVs that also serve as the plane’s communication, power and sensor systems. Not having to add a battery or external sensors means less weight on the plane.”” The program is expected to create 70 high-tech jobs in Ohio during its first three years and 165 jobs in the second five years.

Read more


Sandvik Coromant and Precorp Partnership Focuses on Composite Machining

4th June 2010 0 comments

Sandvik Coromant and Precorp Inc. have reached a cooperation agreement with the aim of being a joint solution provider for composite machining. As partners, Sandvik Coromant and Precorp will provide products using PCD vein technology and innovative carbide solutions as well as application know how for the composite industry. The PCD vein technology incorporates a precision sintered slot of PCD onto the cutting edge improving the quality and efficiency of the tool. Sandvik Coromant and Precorp say that the partnership secures the development of innovative solutions and strengthens the niche for diamond based cutting tools, particularly in the rapidly growing composite aerospace segment. Sandvik Tooling acquired 49% of the shares in Precorp Inc., during 2008.

Read more


Liquid Resin Infusion Simulation Project Completed

4th June 2010 0 comments

The PreCarBi European Research Consortium, initiated three years ago, had the main objective of developing a new generation of binder composite materials and associated simulation tools. The scientific aim of PreCarBi consortium was to develop new binder composite materials that would allow pre-form designs to be manufactured and shaped under high temperature; or local tow reinforcement to be added under high temperature. This resulting research is considered an important contribution for advanced Liquid Resin Infusion (LRI) technologies to compete with expensive and complex pre-preg composite technologies. Overall, the research consortium, coordinated by ESI GmbH, included two aircraft manufacturers: Airbus and Eurocopter; a tier one supplier: FACC; three materials manufacturers: Toho Tenax Europe, Sigmatex and Huntsman Advanced Materials (Switzerland) GmbH; a digital simulation software supplier: ESI Group; and four universities and research institutes: Cranfield University, IPM Latvia, University of Patras and SICOMP. Different draping and injection strategies were finally tested on three industrial demonstrator parts using the new materials and the Liquid Composite Moulding (LCM) manufacturing feasibility analyzed during the research project. “Composites have become the material of choice for many advanced aircraft structural applications, but research is still required to identify more cost effective manufacturing and simulation tools to optimize their manufacturing and design”, said Dr. Anthony Pickett, Scientific Director at ESI GmbH. “The PreCarBi project has made a significant contribution to a new binder composite that will have a significant impact on the composite manufacturing industry and the aircraft manufacturing industry as a whole.”

Read more


[ Page 1 of 6 ]

Advertisement

Upcoming Events

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Follow us
Subscribe to our email newsletter

Subscribe to receive our weekly round-up of all the industry's latest news, jobs, events and more!

We'll always keep your personal details secure and will never share them with third parties for marketing purposes. You can unsubscribe at any time. For further details on how we may use your data, please visit our Privacy Policy.