NetComposites

Connecting you to the composites industry

Advertisement

Composites Industry News

News for September 2007


Comp Air Unveils Latest Design

4th September 2007 0 comments

Comp Air Aviation of Merritt Island, Florida, and Downing Aviation Associates of Phoenix, Arizona will work jointly to secure funding, engineering and operational resources for Comp Air’s new 310-knot single engine Model 12 turboprop aircraft. The Model 12 is the latest design in the Comp Air series, which initially flew in March 2007, and is currently in flight-testing at the Comp Air facilities in Florida. The new composite-structured aircraft, which features an 8-place, pressurized, standup cabin, 310 knot maximum cruise speed and up to 2500 nautical mile range will enter final design and certification testing shortly, with planned production commencing in mid 2010. Comp Air Aviation expects design and flight-testing activities to continue in Merritt Island, while alternative and expanded facilities for production of the major sections of the aircraft and final assembly, both in Florida or at other suitable areas, are explored.

Read more


PlastiComp Expands LFT Pellet Capacity

4th September 2007 0 comments

Increasing customer demand for Complet long fiber reinforced pellets provides expansion opportunities for PlastiComp. The new LFT pellet line will increase the company’s annual pellet capacity with an additional 3-5 million pounds. Based on PlastiComp’s rate of growth, the company has planned similar expansion for each of the next several years “Customers like our business model, our products and our business process. We are very focused on our customers needs and we strive to provide a product solution that best meets their requirements. This means that we provide people-to-people interface and high quality technology with a desire to become a most highly valued supplier to our customers. We believe that our business success will follow the customer’s success and our customer relationship will be sustained and valued because we are dedicated to becoming a supportive team member to our customers, much more than simply supplying volumes of LFT pellets,” said Steve Bowen, PlastiComp President and CEO. . PlastiComp is also preparing a new plant site in the Winona area for occupancy during 2008. The new facility details will be released when finalized in Q4, 2007. The company continues to supply both D-LFT technology via Pushtrusion and LFT pellets via Complet composite pellets.

Read more


Redelease Takes Over the Distribution of GP’s Liquid Phenolics

4th September 2007 0 comments

Georgia-Pacific has decided to transfer the distribution of liquid phenolic resins to Redelease, following the agreement on powdered resins signed in 2005. At that time, the Brazilian company Redelease started to distribute powdered phenolic resins manufactured locally by Georgia-Pacific (GP). “Based on the positive results of this partnership, above all, pursuant to a well defined focus and abiding technical support, we just decided to transfer to Redelease the distribution of liquid phenolic resins”, said Gustavo Vasques, GP’s General Manager. Redelease’s scope of action, he detailed, will be the composites market. Whereas powdered phenolic resin is used to manufacture brake pads, loudspeaker parts and fireworks, among other products, the liquid version is used as raw material for floors gratings and other high performance composites. “They are products regularly applied to strict sites concerning fire spread and smoke control, for instance, on offshore platforms”, explains Alexandre Coelho, GP’s Accounting Manager. GP’s phenolic resins are the only ones manufactured in Brazil that are approved by Petrobras, one of the biggest companies in the world specialized in oil exploration. ”We are happy with GP’s decision and more motivated to grow in the phenolic resin’s segment”, stated Rubens Cruz, Redelease’s Director.

Read more


Resin Systems Starts Commercial Production

4th September 2007 0 comments

Resin Systems’ contract manufacturer, Global Composite Manufacturing, has begun commercial production of RStandard utility poles from the first production cell in Tilbury, Ontario. Commercial production has begun following the completion last week of climate controls on the first production cell and all required quality checks. Production began with one shift and Global Composite Manufacturing plans to add second and third shifts shortly with full production from the first cell anticipated in the fourth quarter. The finished product will initially be dedicated to customer shipments and trial production of several product improvements developed this year. “The beginning of commercial production is a critical milestone reached through the dedicated joint effort of Global Composite Manufacturing and RS over many months. We will now turn our attention to adding shifts on the first cell and working on the preparation of the second cell,” said Paul Giannelia, president and chief executive officer. “These are the next important steps in reaching our goal of establishing meaningful revenue increases by the end of this year and reaching profitability in 2008.””

Read more


IFC to Help Owens Corning Expand Capacity

4th September 2007 0 comments

IFC, a member of the World Bank Group, will invest $12 million to help Owens Corning (India) Limited to expand the capacity of its glass-fibre manufacturing facility at Taloja, in the Indian state of Maharashtra. The project expands the existing glass melter and related downstream equipment and modernizes the technology deployed. This will result in significant energy and efficiency improvements. The global market for glass-fibre, which was estimated at 3.2 million tons in 2006, is projected to grow at an annual rate of 4.2 percent, reaching 3.7 million tons by 2010. The Indian glass-fibre market is small compared to major markets, such as Europe and the United States. Over the last few years, demand for glass-fibre in India grew at an average of about 20 percent a year, reaching 49,500 tons in 2006, when installed capacity was 58,000 tons annually. The demand is expected to increase by 18 percent a year over the medium term, driven by the growing infrastructure and automotive sectors. With Owen Corning’s expansion, India’s installed glass-fibre capacity will increase to 67,000 tons a year by the end of 2007. “IFC’s investments will help us continue to improve our efficiency and competitiveness,” explained Satish Kulkarni, Managing Director of Owens Corning (India) Limited. “We have been partnering with IFC since 1997, when they helped us set up an advanced technology greenfield venture. Their global knowledge and expertise has helped us strengthen our business in the region, as well as influenced other lenders’ long-term view of our company.” “Working with Indian companies to restructure and expand their businesses, while strengthening their competitiveness, is a key component of IFC’s strategy in South Asia. With this investment, we will help expand the capacity of glass-fiber and encourage Owens Corning to continue implementing environmentally friendly technologies and processes,” said Paolo M. Martelli, IFC Regional Director for South Asia. “We are pleased with the progress that Owens Corning has made over the years in establishing itself as a strong player in India’s glass-fibre industry,” said Dimitris Tsitsiragos, IFC Director for Global Manufacturing and Services. “Our continued partnership shows our confidence in the company, as we endorse its commitment to following good practices and raising standards in the industry.” Owens Corning (India) Limited is a joint venture between Owens Corning U.S.A., and Mahindra & Mahindra, India.

Read more


Civil Engineering Team Expands Research on Bridges

4th September 2007 0 comments

A civil engineering team’s research at K-State on rural bridges remains unaffected by the bridge collapse in Minneapolis. An ongoing, two-year research project titled “”Intelligent Structural Health Monitoring of Rural Bridges,”” proposes a plan to develop a system to monitor and sustain a bridge’s capacity. The system uses a wireless sensory network system and experiments with a cost-effective, structural fibre reinforced polymer to reinforce bridge strength. The team working on the research is composed of Hayder Rasheed, Robert Peterman, Asadollah Esmaeily, Hani Melhelm and Brandon Decker. This particular project is one of the few, if not the only, current research project that is composed of the special system that includes evaluating and applying solutions to enhance bridge safety, Esmaeily, assistant Professor of Structural Engineering, said. Esmaeily said team members thought it was necessary to find a way to develop a system using existing resources that was effective in identifying and solving internal discrepancies in bridges. With a budget of about $70,000 allocated by the University Transportation Department, the researchers were able to develop an experiment to simulate durability. Esmaeily said many factors can affect the internal dynamic properties of a bridge, making it important to internally examine bridges annually for problems that might have developed from everyday use. “”Bridges are a crucial component to the transportation system,”” Esmaeily said. “”If something were wrong with a bridge, people would not notice until something bad happened.”” According to a report prepared by Decker and Rasheed, associate professor of civil engineering, the team constructed three identical T-Beams to test the FRP repair and strengthening technique. They then settled on wireless technology provided by Micro strain, that would be used to gage strain on the framework. Similar research already has been conducted on buildings and other structures, Esmaeily said, but bridges are more complex, making the research much more intensive and time-consuming. The team has contributed more than 200 hours to the project. This has not deterred the team in their efforts to increase the efficiency of bridges as they have done all of their research without receiving direct payment for the time they invested, said Peterman, associate professor of civil engineering. The collapse of the Interstate 35W bridge on Aug. 2 in Minneapolis raised questions and concerns about the safety of bridges everywhere, particularly Kansas where there are six bridges that have a similar deck-truss design as did the Interstate 35W bridge. The aftermath of the Interstate 35W bridge collapse did not affect the team’s research, but interviews with local TV stations and newspapers did bring their work into the public’s eye.

Read more


BlastGard to Acquire Innovative Composites Inc

4th September 2007 0 comments

BlastGard International has entered into an option agreement to purchase 100% of Innovative Composites Incorporated (Innovative), a Michigan based corporation engaged in the design, engineering and manufacturing of continuous fibre reinforced thermoplastics.

Read more


Prosthetic Foot Receives the World’s Biggest Design Award

4th September 2007 0 comments

Canadian designer Sébastien Dubois was presented with an Index: Award for Mobility for Each One, a prosthetic foot which costs only 8 US Dollars to produce. Approximately 25 000 people, mostly civilians, are mutilated by landmines each year. Hundred of thousands of victims all over the world need proper prosthetic products in order to resume an active life. Unfortunately, a quality prosthesis usually costs between 1300 and 4000 US Dollars, which many do not have the economic means to afford. However, Canadian designer Sébastien Dubois has designed a low-cost, high-quality model that can be locally produced for only 8 US Dollars. Function and costs were the paramount design parameters in Dubois’ energy-return prosthetic foot. This type of prosthesis reproduces the impulse of the toes propelling the amputated leg and enables the user to move faster and even run. Add to that the low production costs and it is obvious why Dubois called his design “Mobility for Each One”. In order to keep production costs down, “Mobility for Each One” can be produced in any conventional workshop, and the materials needed are easily available. The design, for instance, uses glass fibre instead of carbon fibre to reduce costs. The prosthetic foot can be fitted to various types of upper leg prosthetics and is developed especially to fit the standards of Red Cross. At the INDEX: AWARD ceremony in Copenhagen, INDEX: jury Chairman and Associate Director at Arup Nille Juul-Sørensen praised not only the prosthesis, which refers to the human foot without trying to copy it, but the entire concept: “Mobility for Each One has an appropriate form, carries the promise to have a huge impact on improving people’s lives and is elegantly designed to fit the context it is designed for. Dubois not only designed a product, but each aspect has been analyzed to simplify the final product, allowing production in any conventional local workshop using easy accessible materials.” Although successfully tested by volunteers, Mobility for Each One is still just a prototype, and Dubois was proud to receive the INDEX: award, which may move his project into the next phase: “I feel very proud and am very honoured to win this award, as it, just as my project, aims to improve the quality of life. I hope the award will serve as a showcase and help Handicap International find the financing needed to optimize Mobility for Each One and to spread awareness of its fabrication techniques.”

Read more


Material Presents Overview of Filament Wound Composite Structures

10th September 2007 0 comments

Filament winding specialist Material presented a paper at the SAMPE Europe Technical Conference and Exhibition in Madrid last week, featuring the use of filament winding technology in aerospace applications. In recent years the amount of carbon fibre used in structural components for aircraft and space applications has significantly increased. Airplanes for commercial aviation are being designed where composite materials represent 50% of the mass. Currently the new launch system VEGA is being tested using the largest composite rocket motor case ever developed in Europe. In times of increasing fuel prices the unique properties of composites help to make air and space transportation more efficient. Filament winding is one of the few manufacturing processes which allow a high level of automation and process control needed to ensure the required production volume and quality control. The paper discussed the benefits and limitations of this technology and showed some examples of recent applications in the aircraft and space industry.

Read more


Teijin Twaron Changes Name to Teijin Aramid

10th September 2007 0 comments

Teijin Twaron has changed its name into Teijin Aramid, affecting all locations worldwide, from production and head office in the Netherlands to all sales offices in the various continents. Over the years Teijin Twaron has become a major supplier of aramid products, with around 50% market share worldwide. Since the acquisition by the Teijin Group in 2000, Teijin Twaron evolved from one brand company (Twaron) to four aramid brands; Twaron, Technora, Sulfron and Teijinconex. Teijin says that the new name Teijin Aramid reflects accurately the present focus of the company and will allow expansion and further development of the product range. The name Twaron is the flagship para-aramid product of Teijin Aramid and its name will remain unchanged.

Read more


[ Page 1 of 5 ]

Advertisement

Upcoming Events

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Follow us
Subscribe to our email newsletter

Subscribe to receive our weekly round-up of all the industry's latest news, jobs, events and more!

We'll always keep your personal details secure and will never share them with third parties for marketing purposes. You can unsubscribe at any time. For further details on how we may use your data, please visit our Privacy Policy.