NetComposites

Connecting you to the composites industry

Advertisement

Composites Industry News

News for 15 November 2007


LM Glasfiber Opens Its Second Turbine Blade Factory in India

15th November 2007 0 comments

LM Glasfiber has officially celebrated the grand opening of its new wind turbine blade factory in Dabaspet, Karnataka in India. The new factory is expected to produce approximately 800 blades per year and create employment for approximately 400 people when ramp-up is completed. At the opening Thorbjørn N. Rasmussen, President of Vestas Asia Pacific said: “”In 2006, the Indian wind energy market was the world’s third largest and it is a market with a very large potential. The opening today of the Dabaspet blade plant provides us with important blade capacity for V82-1.65MW wind turbines to execute on our growth strategy in India and enables us to tap into the future growth of the Indian and global markets.”” In his inauguration speech, LM Glasfiber CEO Roland Sundén said: “”I’m deeply impressed by India’s strong commitment to wind power. At LM Glasfiber we are extremely proud to play an active role in this development together with our customers, and we are pleased to be able to trace our business relationship with Vestas in India all the way back to 1995 when we opened our first factory. We are happy to be reinforcing this long-lasting relationship today with the opening of our new factory.”” The Dabaspet factory is LM Glasfiber’s second blade manufacturing facility in India and the 11th worldwide, and it completes LM Glasfiber’s 1GW 2007 capacity expansion programme including two new factories in Spain and China opened earlier this year. Thorbjørn Rasmussen, President of Vestas Asia Pacific and Roland Sundén, CEO LM Glasfiber shake hands after the official opening of LM Glasfiber’s new facilities in Dabaspet, India.

Read more


Integran and ACG to Jointly Develop Composite Tooling

15th November 2007 0 comments

Integran Technologies and Advanced Composites Group (ACG) have entered into a Joint Development Agreement (JDA) for advanced carbon fibre composite (CFC) tooling solutions based upon Integran’s Nanovar technology platform.

Read more


Henkel Launches New Composite Peel Ply for Long Term Durability

15th November 2007 0 comments

The aerospace group of Henkel Corporation has introduced and qualified a new resin-impregnated peel ply, Hysol EA 9895 WPP, eliminating the need for secondary composite surface preparation, such as sanding or bead blasting. Henkel says that Hysol EA 9895 WPP features easy removal on large composite parts and delivers an optimum bond surface. Henkel’s aerospace research and development group discovered that current dry peel plies leave contaminant fibres on the composite surfaces. These contaminants become potential sites for weaknesses in bond line durability. This background information was the subject of a 2005 SAMPE paper published by Henkel entitled Key Factors in the Peel Ply Preparation Process. Hysol EA 9895 WPP also was the subject of an independent 2007 SAMPE paper published by authors from Boeing and the University of Washington. The paper, titled Influence of Peel Ply on Adhesive Bonding of Composites, evaluated an array of composite substrates with commercial structural bonding films. Hysol EA 9895 WPP demonstrated good bond line durability and excellent cohesive failure modes regardless of the adhesive and prepreg combination. “This information is important to the aerospace industry as composites move into primary structures,” said Michael Cichon, Director of Marketing, Henkel. “With this emerging information, composite users have access to the best tools available.”

Read more


Pre-Preg Thermoset Composite Suits Slot Cell Insulation

15th November 2007 0 comments

Norplex-Micarta has launched NP511B, a pre-preg thermoset composite material used for slot cell insulation, steel coating, and other high temperature applications. NP511B can be moulded in conjunction with abrasion-resistant substrates such as Kevlar or Nomex and is designed reduce or eliminate surface wear damage to copper and steel components in generators. Norplex-Micarta says that the resulting custom composite offers long life in wear applications without the risk of damage to sensitive equipment due to abrasion-generated dust particles. NP511B is composed of an electrical grade epoxy resin combined with a woven glass substrate. Its non-brominated resin system offers high mechanical strength at temperatures up to 170°C. When cured properly, NP511B retains half of its room temperature flexural strength at temperatures up to 150°C. The power generation industry relies on high temperature pre-pregs that can endure extreme heat and mechanical conditions. Physical properties include resilience at elevated temperatures; tensile, compressive, shear, and flexural strength; creep resistance; abrasion resistance; and electrical insulation properties.

Read more


Elasticity of Carbon Nanotubes Gives Ballistic Protection

15th November 2007 0 comments

New research in carbon nanotechnology could give those in the line of fire materials which can bounce bullets without a trace of damage. A research paper published in the Institute of Physics’ Nanotechnology details how engineers from the Centre for Advanced Materials Technology at the University of Sydney have found a way to use the elasticity of carbon nanotubes to not only stop bullets penetrating material but actually rebound their force. Most anti-ballistic materials, like bullet-proof jackets and explosion-proof blankets, are currently made of multiple layers of Kevlar, Twaron or Dyneema fibres which stop bullets from penetrating by spreading the bullet’s force. Targets can still be left suffering blunt force trauma – perhaps severe bruising or, worse, damage to critical organs. The elasticity of carbon nanotubes means that blunt force trauma may be avoided and that’s why the engineers in Sydney have undertaken experiments to find the optimum point of elasticity for the most effective bullet-bouncing gear. Prof Liangchi Zhang and Dr Kausala Mylvaganam from the Centre for Advanced Materials Technology in Sydney, said, “By investigating the force-repelling properties of carbon nanotubes and concluding on an optimum design, we may produce far more effective bulletproof materials. “The dynamic properties of the materials we have found means that a bullet can be repelled with minimum or no damage to the wearer of a bullet proof vest.” The paper “”Ballistic resistance capacity of carbon nanotubes”” (Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 475701) is available as part of the Institute of Physics Publishing’s Nanotechnology series.

Read more


New Sole Distributor for SP Products in Italy

15th November 2007 0 comments

SP, the Marine business of Gurit, has appointed Resintex Technology srl as their new sole distributor for SP branded products including Corecell for the Italian Market.

Read more


New Wipes for Ease of Cleaning

15th November 2007 0 comments

Adhere from Intertronics have just launched pre-saturated ADH1610 Isopropyl alcohol wipes to aid the formation of better adhesive bonds. Isopropyl alcohol is a common solvent for the final preparation, cleaning and degreasing of substrates prior to adhesive bonding. In addition, it is useful for cleaning up many uncured adhesives, sealants and resins. Adhere ADH1610 Isopropyl wipes come in boxes of 50 wipes, each pre-saturated with an optimal amount of solvent for the cleaning task so as to replace dispensing bottles and glass containers, minimise user exposure and improve health and safety. Each wipe is made from non-abrasive hydroentangled cellulose/polyester with low particulate generation and extra absorbency. Intertronics say that ADH1610 wipes are excellent for removal of fluxes, light oils, polar soils, dirt, inks and oxides, and that they are safe on plastics, including the preparation of metal and composite surfaces prior to painting. Free sample wipes are available from Intertronics.

Read more


Engineered LFTs Ascend to Top of the Plastics Pyramid with VLF PEEK

15th November 2007 0 comments

RTP Company’s engineered Long Fiber Thermoplastic (LFT) pellet portfolio has soared to the top of the polymer pyramid with the commercialization of VLF (Very Long Fibre) PEEK in radomes for military weapon systems. The ability of these radomes made with VLF PEEK to resist failure during high speed launches was an impressive improvement over short glass reinforced PEEK and led to the eventual replacement of the incumbent thermoset composite system. “”Elevating the performance capability of highly engineered polymers is a cornerstone of our long fibre strategy,”” said Eric Lee, Business Manager for Structural Products at RTP Company. RTP 2299 X 108578C, a 50% long glass fibre reinforced PEEK, has a notched Izod impact of 240 J/m; an increase of 65% compared to a 50% short glass reinforced PEEK compound; and maintains an impressive Flexural Modulus of 19,306 MPa and Heat Deflection Temperature of 316°C measured at 1.8MPa. “”The improvement in toughness with high stiffness at elevated temperatures is a hallmark benefit of articles moulded with VLF composite pellets. Extending these advantages with VLF PEEK is very satisfying to our product development team and will enable new applications to be realized,”” said Lee. The increased performance of RTP 2299 X 108578C above and beyond the limits of short fibre reinforced PEEK are expected to create new opportunities for fastener, oil field, and compressor related applications. In addition to performance benefits, injection moulding VLF PEEK achieved cost savings by reducing the cycle time by several minutes, and VLF PEEK parts exit the mould in finished form ready for assembly. “”Creating high performance thermoplastic composite solutions that are injection mouldable is a tremendous value for everyone”” said Lee.

Read more


SAMPE Fall Technical Conference 2007 Success

15th November 2007 0 comments

SAMPE say that their Fall Technical Conference was an incredible success, drawing 800 attendees for advanced conference programming and a sold out exhibit hall. The four conference tracks featured tutorials, papers sessions and panel discussions focusing on the four fields experiencing the most growth and highest demand for advanced education: Nanomaterials, Propulsion, Computational Materials Science, and Morphing. “The response to this conference has been outstanding. The draw of the four special conference tracks have demonstrated the need this industry has for technology advancement in these fields,” said Michael McCabe, University of Dayton Research Institute and SAMPE General Co-Chair. This year’s fall conference also featured a luncheon, with Stephen Bonadies, Chief Conservator at the Cincinnati Art Museum speaking about the science of art conservation. Mr. Bonadies expressed the challenges facing art conservators and the art they work to preserve. The talk complimented the conference theme “From Art to Science: Advancing Materials & Process Engineering.” This theme was carried on throughout the conference, with an art contest sponsored by the SAMPE Midwest Chapter and a panel discussion titled “Design as a Fundamental Process for Transdisciplinarity ‘Art to Science’: Educating Engineers”. Led by James Seferis, this panel discussion explored the innovation of design and art in multiple disciplines crucial to the success of engineers. “The conference attendees’ exposure to such a wide range of leading edge technology presentations, was what made this well-organized technical conference a success,” said Bob Griffiths, SAMPE President. In addition to the strategic conference planning, the three exhibit halls provided attendees the opportunity to meet with exhibitors representing all facets of the industry. The next SAMPE Fall Technical Conference will take place September 8-11, 2008, at the Cook Convention Center in Memphis, Tennessee. SAMPE’s Michigan Chapter will sponsor the program. Joining SAMPE will be the American Society for Composites and ATSM D-30.

Read more


Video Shows Buckyballs Form By Shrink Wrapping

15th November 2007 0 comments

The birth secret of buckyballs — hollow spheres of carbon no wider than a strand of DNA — has been caught on tape by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories and Rice University. An electron microscope video and computer simulations show that “”shrink-wrapping”” is the key; buckyballs start life as distorted, unstable sheets of graphite, shedding loosely connected threads and chains until only the perfectly spherical buckyballs remain. Buckyballs were discovered at Rice in 1985, but understanding the intimate details of their formation has vexed scientists. Buckyballs form at high temperatures, and one long-standing theory of their genesis is the “”hot giant”” hypothesis, which suggests that the carbon atoms first assemble by the thousands in flat graphite sheets. Heat distorts the sheets, “”shrink wrapping”” them into ever-smaller shapes, and buckyballs survive, thanks to their perfect symmetry. “”This ‘hot evolution’ is so rapid that it was nearly impossible to prove or disprove it by experimental observation,”” said study co-author Boris Yakobson, professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at Rice. “”Sandia’s Jianyu Huang solved this problem by creating an ingenious, controllable heat bath inside a 10-nanometer-wide nanotube. That allowed him to capture video of giant fullerenes gradually shrinking.”” Huang, who performed the experiments while at Boston College and analyzed the data at Sandia, said the results constitute the first experimental evidence for the “”shrink-wrapping”” and “”hot-giant”” fullerene birth mechanisms. Huang captured the high-resolution images using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The video shows a large fullerene, with an estimated 2,000 atoms of carbon gradually shrinking. It confirmed predictions about the atomic mechanisms that Yakobson’s team at Rice had made based on detailed computer simulations. “”If heat is sustained, as it was when we took these images, the fullerenes undergo a further shrinking and vanish,”” Huang said. “”This confirms an aspect of ‘shrink wrapping’ theory that was predicted by Rice’s Rick Smalley and Bob Curl shortly after they discovered fullerenes.”” Huang and Yakobson said it may be possible to exploit the findings to control the fullerene formation process and tailor fullerenes for a variety of applications. Co-authors of the research include research scientist Feng Ding and graduate student Kun Jiao, both of Rice. The research was funded by the Office of Naval Research and the Department of Energy’s Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies.

Read more


Advertisement

Upcoming Events

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Follow us
Subscribe to our email newsletter

Subscribe to receive our weekly round-up of all the industry's latest news, jobs, events and more!

We'll always keep your personal details secure and will never share them with third parties for marketing purposes. You can unsubscribe at any time. For further details on how we may use your data, please visit our Privacy Policy.