NetComposites
Thermwood

Sumitomo Bakelite and GRIP Metal to Develop Thermoset Composite Applications

02 January 2018

Sumitomo Bakelite and GRIP Metal to Develop Thermoset Composite Applications

Sumitomo Bakelite and GRIP Metal have entered into a joint development agreement to develop lightweight thermoset composite applications.

GRIP Metal is derived from the PACE award winning NRS technology which enables metal surface modification resulting in mechanical bonding between friction material and steel backing plates in brake pads

In addition to automotive products, Sumitomo Bakelite and GRIP Metal will explore markets such as aerospace and building infrastructure where cost effective thermoset composite solutions can add value. The combination of GRIP Metal and thermoset composite is said to provide durable mechanical robustness beyond a purely composite solution.

“We are delighted to partner with GRIP Metal to identify new opportunities where the application of GRIP Metal technology in our intelligent hybrid thermoset composite design process can enable significant weight reduction in traditionally ‘out-of-reach’ applications for thermoset composites,” says Goichiro Kuwaki, CEO, Sumitomo Bakelite North America. “Combined with proven high volume industrialised processes such as injection moulding, these weight reductions can be achieved with lower lifetime cost than current materials.”


Photo provided by Sumitomo Bakelite





Related / You might like...

Scigrip Appoints Biesterfeld Distributor to French Markets

Scigrip has expanded its agreement with Biesterfeld Spezialchemie to include France and the French territories in Northern Africa, with immediate effect.

EconCore Presents Developments in Thermoplastic Honeycomb Core Technology

EconCore will unveil the latest developments in its thermoplastic honeycomb core production technology at NPE2018 on 7-11 May in Orlando, Florida, US.

Composite Advantage Introduces Standard Line of FRP Trail Bridges

Short-lived bridge products that require constant care and regular replacement have prompted parks and recreation agencies to look for longer lasting alternatives.