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Revolution Fibres Gains Aerospace Certification, Triples Production Capacity

03 April 2018

Revolution Fibres Gains Aerospace Certification, Triples Production Capacity

New Zealand company Revolution Fibres is tripling nanofibre production to meet increased international demand from a range of industries, from cosmetics manufacturers through to Formula One teams.

Revolution Fibres uses electrospinning technology to create nanofibre out of a range of materials including polymers and natural sources such as collagen from hoki fish skins. Traditionally, nanofibre has been used in air and water filters, and in lithium batteries. However, a growing number of applications means Revolution Fibres products are finding niche uses across a vast range of industries, the company reports. CEO Iain Hosie says international demand has meant tripling production with more growth expected this year as nanofibre is used increasingly for large scale manufacturing as well as niche application areas such as the aerospace industry.

Revolution Fibres has also renewed its AS9100D certification, a quality assurance requirement which allows it to develop a wider range of products for its aerospace clients. The company reports that it is the only nanofibre producer in the world to meet aerospace industry standards.

“We are now working right across multiple sectors, using both synthetic and bio-based materials," Hosie states. "We are ramping up production to ensure we can supply a wide range of new clients and opportunities.”

He says there are endless applications for nanofibres and this is reflected in the growing demand for products. Companies are constantly searching for ways to enhance and make products better and stronger or to enhance existing products, he notes.

“That’s the beauty of nanofibre, it can give those in highly competitive industries, where innovation is key, a crucial edge over the competition,” he adds.

Nanofibres are textiles made from super-fine fibres between 100-500 nanometres in width (a human hair is 50,000 nm wide), made from a wide variety of polymers. These small fibres can create vast changes in mechanical strength, reactivity and conductivity, among many other properties.

Last year the company's product Xantu.Layr, a nanofibre composite reinforcement veil, was a finalist for a number of international awards including the Future Textiles Award and RISE Innovation Awards 2017.


Photo provided by Revolution Fibres




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