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Car Carrier Cuts Weight Through Diab Solution

06 June 2017

Car Carrier Cuts Weight Through Diab Solution

By replacing three out of 13 decks with Divinycell sandwich panels, shipbuilder Uljanik cut the deck weight of car carrier Siem Cicero by 25%.

Uljanik, of Croatia, and Diab initiated talks almost two years ago, which resulted in the design of Siem Cicero. The ship will be used for the transportation of cars and heavy vehicles for Siem Car Carriers. With a length of two football fields, the ship can carry 7000 vehicles and it incorporates new technologies that will reduce environmental impact and cut cost.

The ship has thirteen decks. Three of the decks are being built as sandwich elements using Diab’s lightweight Divinycell core material. Each deck uses 2500 m2 of Divinycell H100 and 1000 m2 of Divinycell H80. Compared with the traditional steel decks the weight savings for the decks will be 25%, or 200 tons, Diab reports. This will result in a reduced fuel consumption of 4% or an increase of the payload.

As the vessel has ten additional decks and a superstructure made of thick steel, there is a tremendous opportunity for further savings in future ships. Through close cooperation and a careful analysis of data from this first vessel, Uljanik and Diab are looking into how core sandwich solutions can be used in other parts of the ships.


Photo provided by Diab





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