Solvay Unveils Zeniva PEEK Polymer for Implantable Devices

05 December 2017

Solvay is introducing Zeniva ZA-600 CF30 polyetheretherketone (PEEK), a 30% carbon fibre reinforced, radiolucent polymer for implantable medical device applications.

The latest addition to Solvay’s portfolio of healthcare solutions, Zeniva ZA-600 CF30 PEEK is said to offer modulus very similar to cortical bone. This means, unlike implantable metals, it can help implants minimise reduction in bone density by maintaining normal stress on surrounding bone tissue.

According to Solvay, the new Zeniva product is an excellent candidate for structural, load-bearing, implantable devices used in spine, hip and knee replacements and offers strength twice that of unmodified PEEK. This is said to allow designers to reduce the size and scale of their implanted devices to make them less intrusive. Further benefits over unmodified PEEK are reported to include exceptional creep resistance and the ability to withstand prolonged fatigue strain.

The new speciality polymer shares unmodified PEEK’s inherent radiolucency, an advantage over metallic solutions that prohibit visualisation of implants and fusions using X-ray, CT scan, MRI and other medical imaging methods.

“Zeniva ZA-600 PEEK CF30 offers the orthopaedic industry an innovative new structural material with the potential to dramatically reduce the manufacturing costs of implantable devices used for sports medicine, trauma and joint reconstruction,” states Jeff Hrivnak, Business Manager for Healthcare at Solvay’s Specialty Polymers global business unit. “Optimised for injection moulding, this material opens the door to cost effective, large-scale production of implants, offering OEMs the economic advantage they need to compete and succeed in this fast growing market.”

The product is manufactured in a dedicated ISO 13485- and cGMP-compliant facility in the US and is tested in ISO 17025 labs. It is part of Solvay’s Solviva family of biomaterials, which offer a range of options for implantable devices used in orthopaedics, cardiovascular, spine and other applications.

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