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The World’s First Electric Fishing Boat

10 November 2015

The World’s First Electric Fishing Boat

Norwegian boat builder Selfa Arctic is now supplying the world’s first electric fishing boat. 

Diab says the boat has been ordered by the Norwegian fishing company Øra and will be included in its fishing operations from September 2015. It claims that almost all structural components of the boat are made in Divinycell H.

According to DIAB, the official name of the world’s first electric fishing boat is Selfa El-Max 1099. It is powered by a Corvus battery system, integrated with a Siemens propulsion system, and can rely entirely on battery power during a 10-hour working day. This enables a 100% emission-free operation. The vessel also produces less noise and vibration that a traditional fishing boat. With a generator installed onboard, the vessel has no constraints in terms of reach. Whilst being docked, it can be charged via a 63 Amps 220V course, taking approximately six to eight hours to charge.

“We have been working on this electric boat design for some time, and Corvus batteries are part of the design solution. Their innovative battery technology enables the vessel to meet the needed performance specifications, that is, to operate electrically for a full fishing day,” says Erik Lanssen, President and CEO of Selfa Arctic.

DIAB explains that, practically, all structural components of Selfa El-Max 1099 are made of Divinycell H. For the bottom of the hull, Selfa uses Divinycell H130 due to its excellent screw retention. The superstructure is built in Divinycell H60 to minimise weight and keep the center of gravity as low as possible. Selfa Arctic receives the Divinycell material in precut pieces, which saves a lot of valuable time for the constructors.

Electrifying smaller Norwegian fishing boats could, according to a report prepared by the Norwegian Seafood Research Fund (FHF), reduce Norway’s yearly carbon dioxide emission by 80,000 tons.

Selfa El-Max 1099 will be part of a research project funded by FHF and the Research Council/MAROFF. The project, which will be managed by SINTEF in Tromso, will map the energy consumption and continue to develop the propulsion solution. The vessel is partially financed by Innovation Norway–Troms and was presented to the Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg in August 2015.

 


Photo provided by Diab




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