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Advanced Engineering 2019

Gresser Companies Becomes Licensee for Primekss Rabine’s PrimeComposite Steel Fibre-reinforced High-tech, Cut-free Flooring System

18 August 2015

Gresser Companies has signed a license agreement with Rabine Group/Primekss of Chicago, US, to provide PrimeComposite, a jointless, steel fibre-reinforced, composite flooring system.

The company is currently licensed to engineer and install PrimeComposite flooring in Minnesota, North and South Dakota, northern Iowa and western Wisconsin, with potential future geographic expansion.

“Concrete is the world’s most ubiquitous building and flooring material,” says Janis Oslejs, CEO of Primekss Group. “PrimeComposite is a better-quality floor that reduces building and usage costs. Gresser Companies, together with Primekss Rabine, is building the most durable, leanest, jointless and environmentally friendly floors the world has ever known. PrimeComposite takes concrete to a new quality and environmental level.”

“Traditional concrete slab design is still based on analysis from the 1950s and ‘60s. Even though slabs are a main complaint of building owners and maintenance managers, there has been very little design effort to improve it,” explains Kevin MacDonald, Principal Engineer at Benton Consulting Engineers.

According to Gresser, concrete dries from the top down resulting in curling at the joints and around the perimeter. This can cause the slab to lose contact with the base material, making it susceptible to fracture. Curling also increases maintenance and repair costs of forklifts, other equipment and the slab. In warehouses, forklifts crossing the step in elevation often results in the forks scraping the floor and jarring impacts. High-reach stackers operate with decreased accuracy and need more maintenance, impacting productivity. Also, storage rack position needs to be planned around uneven flooring at the joints.

“Conforming to International Building Code, PrimeComposite jointless floors are a different way to approach slabs on ground. Comparable to solutions that have been around for over 20 years, this is a more modern construction,” continues MacDonald. “Conceptually similar to carbon fibre, the steel fibres and expanding construction spread out the load over a large area. A thinner slab of PrimeComposite flooring is stronger than traditional concrete slabs and requires no joints. While some cracking may occur, the steel fibres prevent sheering.”





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