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Motive Unveils the Kestrel Interior Featuring Advanced Bio-Composites

19 July 2011

The Motive Kestrel, a 3 door, 4 passenger, electric vehicle, will be made using bio-composite material in its body as well as in the interior.

Nathan Armstrong, President of Motive says that bio-composite material derived from hemp and flax fibre will be used to create the headliner, door panels, door trim, floor tub and centre tunnel, instrument panel and the centre console panel. “Everything except the dashboard and steering wheel, which will require areas made from urethane for compliance with safety standards.’

Darren McKeage the designer of the Kestrel vehicle adds, ‘the bio-composite material adds a unique look and feel to the interior, it can be left raw, so the natural fibres are visible, covered in vinyl paint film, or wrapped in fabric to provide the purchaser additional customisation’.

Motive explain that the advantages of using bio-composites over traditional materials are numerous including: the production of bio-composite material is less manufacturing energy intensive, reduced weight, and reduced cost, and ability to produce the material locally.






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