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Licences Granted for Composite Energy Recovery and Storage Systems

14 May 2010

The University of Reading and Sciotech Projects Limited have granted an exclusive worldwide licence to Advanced Composite Manufacturing Limited (ACM) to manufacture and supply energy recovery and storage systems.

The energy recovery and storage system captures energy normally lost when a bus or train brakes or a crane lowers a container in a controlled manner. The stored energy is then reused during the next work cycle, for example when the bus or train next accelerates away or when the crane lifts another container. ACM say that the resulting savings in fuel and carbon emissions can be as high as 50%.

The technology licence covers the manufacture, assembly and sale of industrial size composite flywheels for use in energy recovery, energy storage and energy re-supply and in power fluctuation management. This technology is applicable to various markets including clean power generation, container handling, and the bus, tram and rail industries. The University of Reading will assist ACM with technology transfer from research to real-world implementation, and ACM has also applied for a Carbon Trust Grant.

Advanced Composite Structures Limited (ACS), who are supported by grant funding from the East Midlands Development Agency to develop and improve manufacturing techniques and processes and to develop a new production line, will manufacture the composite flywheel components for ACM.

Design engineering, sales and marketing of the systems will be undertaken by Cress Energy Storage Systems Ltd, who have also won an award of £40,000 from the Shell Springboard competition for the use of these systems to tackle climate change. Dr Rayner Mayer, Managing Director of Cress says, “It is incredibly rewarding that such a well established program as Shell Springboard has also recognised the outstanding potential”.

Designs and drawings have been completed; the tooling phase and a prototype flywheel should be completed ready for testing within 6 - 8 months. Endurance testing and type approval will be carried out by The University of Czech SVUM within the EU funded Eureka 2462 project. Cranfield University is assisting by supplying some of the tooling, a range of filament wound prototype components and technology transfer.






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