NetComposites
Airtech

Joint Initiative Develops Breakthrough in Thermosets

06 November 2009

DSM Composite Resins, Dieffenbacher and Fraunhofer ICT have combined efforts on a direct compounding technology that extends thermoset composites to high volume, complex and large parts production

At a joint press conference held during the Composites Europe show, it was hoped that this development could help to open up new market opportunities for composite applications that are not feasible with today’s thermoset processing technologies.

The new thermoset direct compounding technology can produce moulded thermoset compound materials in a continuous and flexible extrusion process. Key features include a computerized dosing system yielding better quality consistency and reproducible fibre impregnation. Therefore the process results in shorter cycle times through just-in-time production and eliminates a range of incremental steps in between such as paste mixing, thickening, storage and steps compared to conventional thermoset compounding processes, saving time and making part manufacturing more economical.

This technology, which entails both a new compounding process and new raw material developments, is the result of many years of research and development in direct compounding technology. It is designed for the production of large structural parts and is set to open up new application opportunities for lightweight thermoset composites replacing conventional metal materials such as aluminium and steel. Developers say that it is particularly suited for the production of geometrically complex large parts greater than 3sq.m in high volumes of approximately 700,000 units per annum.

Heinrich Ernst, Director of the Composites Division of Dieffenbacher, commented: “We previewed this exciting and innovative new technology at the JEC show earlier this year and we are delighted to see this project now come to fruition and be officially unveiled here at the Composites Europe. It is a revolutionary technology that will create enhanced value and new opportunities for the composite manufacturing industry and we are highly confident about its potential.”

“This expands the boundaries of traditional thermoset composite parts production,” said Wilfrid Gambade, Business Director Composite Resins Europe and Global Market, DSM Composite Resins. “And it will create opportunities for parts manufacturers in new application areas in key markets like automotive industry but also energy or Building and Infrastructure, producing high strength, lightweight and complex parts in high volumes, faster and more economically than before.”

Fraunhofer ICT Deputy Director, Prof. Frank Henning added: “This has been an intense and highly productive research and development effort, and reflects the combined commitment and motivation of three industry leaders in DSM, Dieffenbacher and Fraunhofer ICT to remain at the forefront of composites innovation.”

The three partners are now preparing the first production line which is planned to be operational in the second quarter of 2010.





Share this story


Related / You might like...

Cobra International Exhibits Product Range at CAMX 2018

Cobra International will showcase a range of composite products at CAMX 2018, including carbon fibre components for the automotive, transportation, marine, water sports and luxury sectors.

ACMA Shows Support for IMAGINE Act

The American Composites Manufacturers Association participated in a roundtable discussion about the IMAGINE Act. Known as the Innovative Materials in American Growth and Infrastructure, Newly Expanded (IMAGINE) Act, the new bill is designed to promote the increased use of innovative materials like fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composites, as well as new manufacturing methods to accelerate the deployment and extend the life of infrastructure projects.

Relining Solution Restores Drinking Water Supply in Amsterdam

After the collapse of a drinking water pipeline in downtown Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Insituform was contracted to reline a close to 100 year old pipe underneath one of the canals. Water was restored successfully within five days, with minimal impact on traffic and the environment.