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Advanced Engineering 2018

Boeing Closer to Assembling First 787 Dreamliner

14 January 2007

Boeing is showing steady progress toward building the first 787 Dreamliner with the rollout of its second specially-modified freighter and a successful first pickup of 787 parts from Japan.

The load consists of section 43, a forward fuselage section made by Kawasaki Heavy Industries, and section 11/45, the centre wheel well and centre wing tank, made by KHI and Fuji Heavy Industries and joined at FHI. These were loaded onto the first 747-400 Large Cargo Freighter - now known as the Dreamlifter - destined for Charleston, S.C.

""Today is an exciting day for Boeing and our Japanese partners,"" said Scott Strode, 787 vice president of Airplane Development and Production. ""Transporting these parts from FHI and KHI is the first step in assembling the first 787. We're very pleased with how it went and with the quality of the parts received.""

In another sign of production readiness, the second Dreamlifter rolled out of the hangar on 7th January in Taipei, Taiwan, sporting its distinctive new white and blue livery. The aircraft will take its first flight in the next few weeks. Three Dreamlifters are being modified by Evergreen Aviation Technologies Corporation at its facility at Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport.





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