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Rolls-Royce Selects Bristol University for Composites Research

23 April 2007

Rolls-Royce has opened a new University Technology Centre (UTC) in Composites at the University of Bristol to further develop technology for future products across its aerospace, marine and energy markets.

The new UTC forms part of the University’s Advanced Composites Centre for Innovation and Science (ACCIS), which was formally launched in Bristol by Malcolm Wicks MP, the UK Minister for Science and Innovation.

Ric Parker, Director – Research and Technology for Rolls-Royce, said: “Composites are recognised as a vital component of aero-engine design and manufacturing capability. We already use composites – the Joint Strike Fighter propulsion system has composite stator aerofoils, for example – but increasingly we expect composites to be applied to gas turbine components operating in more demanding parts of the engine, and to a wider range of products, including our civil engines.

“Bristol is a proven centre of excellence for composite research and development – as today’s launch of ACCIS shows – and we are delighted to make this the focus of our own composites research. Academic collaboration is increasingly important, and I expect Bristol will work with our international university research network on this important technology area.”

The Composites centre is the 28th UTC Rolls-Royce has established worldwide. Many of these are in the UK, but in recent years several have also been inaugurated overseas, reflecting the company’s global research and technology presence.

The Bristol-based UTC will act as a focus for composites research activities, liaising closely with other UTCs and academic outlets that have expertise in this area to provide a co-ordinated programme to meet the needs of Rolls-Royce. These include the Rolls-Royce funded UTC at Dresden and other UK universities including Imperial College (London), Oxford, Nottingham and Ulster.

It will provide a validated analysis capability for the mechanical response of composites that can be used to design composite engine components. Work programmes will include development of new test and analysis methods, understanding fatigue and damage tolerance, and studying 3-D woven composites.

Bristol will have an academic team headed by Professor Michael Wisnom, Director of ACCIS and Professor of Aerospace Structures at Bristol University, and a research team incorporating post-doctoral researchers, PhD students, in addition to dedicated technician, project management and administrative support.

Professor Wisnom said: “We are delighted to have the opportunity to establish this new centre, and look forward to applying our expertise on design, analysis and manufacture of advanced composites to components and structures of interest to Rolls-Royce.”

The Advanced Composites Centre for Innovation and Science (ACCIS) at the University of Bristol brings together an interdisciplinary team of more than 50 researchers working on the science, engineering and application of fibre reinforced composite materials and structures. Research spans four broad themes: Multifunctional Composites & Novel Microstructures; Design, Analysis & Failure; Intelligent Structures and Composites Processing and Characterisation.






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