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EconCore Licences Honeycomb Core Materials and Technology

29 October 2006

ThermHex and TorHex honeycomb core materials and technologies, developed at the university K.U.Leuven in Belgium, are now marketed by the spin-off company EconCore.

EconCore took over the world wide licensing for both patented low cost technologies for automotive, packaging, furniture, building and other applications. They have invested in a demonstration line which can continuously produce the thermoplastic honeycomb core in a width of 1.4 m and a speed of 10 m/min. The Institute for the Promotion of Innovation by Science and Technology in Flanders (IWT) is supporting this development.

Econocore say that the ThermHex technology allows cost efficient continuous production of thermoplastic honeycomb core material from a single continuous thermoplastic film by three successive in-line operations – thermoforming, folding and bonding. ThermHex honeycombs may be produced from different thermoplastic polymers directly from the extruder or from a roll of thermoplastic film.






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