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Hydrosize Technologies Receives Phase II SBIR Award from NAVAIR

12 April 2006

Hydrosize Technologies has received a Phase II SBIR award ($750,000 for 2 years) from the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) to continue the development of a solvent free high temperature sizing.

During Phase I of this research, Hydrosize Technologies and university partner, Michigan State University, successfully demonstrated the synthesis and processability of their high temperature sizing. The Phase II research will support the continued R&D and optimization of the sizing as well as issues regarding the scaling of the technology from the research lab to larger scale production.

“This award from NAVAIR recognizes the potential of our high temperature aqueous sizing for use in advanced composites. We have shown that our sizing has thermal stability that is equal to the matrix resins studied” said Dr. Andrew Brink, Vice - President of Hydrosize Technologies, Inc. The research is targeted to meet the demanding requirements of composites in aerospace applications, however many other commercial applications will benefit as well.





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