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Russian Aviation Industry to Partner Boeing for 787 Dreamliner Nose-cone

20 May 2005

Boeing’s 787 Dreamliner design team has selected Boeing’s Russian production team for the design of the 787 nose-cone.

Boeing's construction centre in Moscow, which employs around one thousand Russian engineers, is now working on designing the plane's nose section and bridge, according to Boeing. Russian engineers at the centre are also designing a cargo aircraft for transporting sections of the new plane's fuselage.

""Hundreds of Russian engineers from the Moscow-based Boeing design centre handle about 30 per cent of designing the fuselage nose cone and about a third of the pylons of the Dreamliner. Half of them are made of composite materials,"" Boeing's Russia-CIS President Sergei Kravchenko has said.

Boeing has signed an over $3 million contract with Russia's central aerodynamics institute (TSAGI) for setting up a centre for practical and dynamic testing of Boeing 787 fuselage panels.

Joint design work is underway on new technologies and testing on other construction elements is being done,. A contract worth over $3 million has been clinched with the Central Aerodynamics Institute for setting up a centre where practical and dynamics testing of Boeing 787 fuselage panels is to be done.

Boeing runs its largest foreign engineering centre in Moscow, employing about 1,000 Russian engineers, of which 300 have participated in designing the Boeing 787 Dreamliner.

Boeing is also working with the Russian Academy of Sciences under the 787 program, along with the All-Russia Institute of Aviation Materials and other Russian organizations.






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