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Third Wave Systems Open Hi-Tech Productivity Centre in Minnesota

03 June 2005

Third Wave Systems (TWS) has opened the Third Wave Systems Productivity Center in Minnesota, featuring a host of technology for the aerospace and automotive sectors.

TWS has partnered with Ellison Machinery to develop the facility, which features state of the art machining centres for aerospace and automotive prototype part design and production. The centre also means new high tech jobs in Minnesota.

The Productivity Center aims to provide the companies client base with ""a deeper service offering"", from process design to part production. Titanium and composite materials will be used by the company to develop new components with improved speed and efficiency.

Congressman Martin Sabo (D-MN) who visited Third Wave Systems last year, said, ""I am pleased that this partnership will create high tech jobs in Minnesota for cutting edge technologies.""

Headquartered in Minneapolis, and with offices in the UK, TWS provide machine modelling software such as AdvantEdge, which is used by over 500 worldwide aerospace and automotive companies to dramatically reduce costs in product design and manufacturing.





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