NetComposites
Advanced Engineering 2018

Roctool introduces the Cage System

08 March 2005

After four years of research, RocTool has released the Cage System, an innovative process for the fabrication of composite materials.

This process uses inductive heating which permits the rapid heating of only the surfaces of the mould. The inductors form a cage around the cast and, after positioning the material to be transformed, an electromagnetic field is created and electrical currents directly heat the mould’s surface. Built-in conventional cooling channels mean that the part is cooled prior to extraction.

This process is claimed to eliminate the need for mould preheating and reduce energy consumption, as well as reducing cycle times and hence production cost by 30 to 40 %.

RocTool plans to create a new production line of composite parts in Chambéry, France, at the end of 2004. Exclusively equipped with the Cage System, this new line will be dedicated to industrial companies wanting to make their parts with this process before investing in the technology. The Cage System is also available through licensing agreements.





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