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Diaphorm Technologies, LLC Expands to New Headquarters

01 April 2005

Diaphorm Technologies, solution provider for the structural composites sector, has relocated its operations to a new 15,000+ square foot in New Hampshire, USA.

Bob Miller, President & CEO of Diaphorm stated that due to the immediate and projected contracts for Diaphorm’s engineering, prototyping and manufacturing expertise the firm will be expanding its sales, engineering and mechanical technician staff .

Located north of the Massachusetts border in New Hampshire, its new operating location will provide Diaphorm easy accessibility to its worldwide customer base via both the Boston and Manchester airports. The new location also exposes the company to a significant talent pool of highly skilled workers, important to its ongoing growth and continued innovation on behalf of its customers in the military, sports and specialty automotive sector.

Diaphorm was formed in 2004 as a result of a management led buyout of the former Diaphorm Division of Solectria and has significant expertise and experience in developing process techniques for the automated forming of continuously reinforced plastic composites.

Diaphorm provides innovative solutions to challenging forming problems in the application of structural composite materials. Supporting these offerings are an array of patented and patent pending systems and methods for preforming and molding continuous fibre reinforced composite products.






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