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New Porsche Relies on F1 Technology

02 June 2003

The two-seat Carrera GT is potentially up there with the Ferrari Enzo as one of the most powerful, engrossing and costly road cars.

Porsche is planning to build a maximum of 1,500 Carrera GTs and says that, globally, a majority of them already have buyers. When they get their hands on their car, they will be able to reach 62 mph in 3.9 seconds and, where such things are allowed, 124 mph in 9.9 seconds. At 5.7 litres, the power unit is a couple of hundred cc larger than Porsche’s sports racing car engine.

But impressive though it all is, it is not enough for Porsche. Renowned for the quality, reliability and longevity of its products, it wanted to create something with outstanding road dynamics. So the really high technology element of the Carrera GT is the use of F1 and aerospace materials, particularly carbon fibre, to make a super-light but super-stiff structure.

The car’s wheels are made of magnesium and Porsche has even managed to halve the weight of the car’s two carbon fibre bucket seats.

Michael Hölscher, Porsche’s Carrera GT Project Manager, says that it is only in F1 that such no-compromise automotive applications are adopted, and that Porsche’s use of new materials and development of existing types to reduce weight and increase strength, has never before been achieved in the development of similar series production cars.






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