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Ohio State University Students Break US National Speed Record

30 October 2003

The Ohio State University student-designed Buckeye Bullet eclipsed the national land speed record for electric vehicles by registering two certified runs at an average speed of 257 mph.

The vehicle's top speed reached 271 mph. Student dedication and technological innovations helped drive this record, with body and tooling composite resins supplied by Ashland Specialty Chemical Company.

The new land speed record was set in time trials at the world-famous Bonneville Salt Flats in Bonneville, Utah and improved over the Buckeye Bullet previous best speed of 240.894 mph, set in Aug. 2002. The previous national record for electric vehicles was 251.3 mph.

The vehicle, which was designed, built and managed by a team of engineering students at the university's Center for Automotive Research-Intelligent Transportation (CAR-IT) traveled to Bonneville this week to attempt to break the record for the fastest speed achieved by an electric car. It is the team's third trip to Utah to make a run at the record.

The streamlined vehicle is 30 feet long, two feet wide and stands less than three feet tall; the 500 horsepower electric motor is powered by more than 12,000 nickel-metal hydride batteries.

""This record has been several years in the making and Ashland is thrilled to tip its hat to the OSU students that made it possible,"" said Dean Doza, National Sales Manager for Ashland Composite Polymers. ""We're honored to have provided the resin technology for this remarkable, student-designed project. It's a fitting showcase of the lightweight but high-endurance capabilities of composites for truly demanding applications.""





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