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Future Combat System Vehicle

24 October 2002

United Defense Industries unveiled two Future Combat System vehicle prototypes, featuring breakthrough technologies for advanced and cost- effective Future Combat Systems vehicles.

""There is significant commonality between the two vehicles, thus affording the flexibility to select a mixed fleet, with wheeled or tracked systems tailored to the mission, without sacrificing the logistics savings inherent in a common design,"" said Elmer Doty, vice president and general manager.

United Defense designed and manufactured its Future Combat System-Wheeled prototype (FCS-W) in less than eight months, demonstrating the Company's ability to meet the Army's objectives and deadlines. The materials and structure of the wheeled 8x8 armored vehicle incorporate leap-ahead technologies and designs. The FCS wheeled prototype shares a high degree of commonality with a second new tracked vehicle, the Future Combat System - Tracked (FCS-T).

The FCS-T prototype will be shown in the U.S. for the first time after being developed for the U.S./U.K. Future Scout and Cavalry System (FSCS) program. FCS-T features hybrid-electric drive, band track and an advanced crew station, among other features.

FCS-W is based on FCS Phase 1 vehicle concepts and designed to demonstrate advanced capabilities that the Army is seeking for its future force. FCS-W features a hybrid-electric drive system and two-man cockpit workstation that incorporates innovations developed for the Future Scout program. The vehicle features new material designs that provide superior ballistic protection through a highly advanced vehicle hull structure.

FCS-W is designed to deliver a top road speed of 75 mph, a maximum cross- country speed of over 40 mph and acceleration from 0-30 mph in 7 seconds. The vehicle features an advanced hybrid structural design that combines titanium, high-strength aluminum, polymer composites and ceramics to provide superior ballistic protection when combined with the latest armors. The unique arrangement of the turbine power unit and drive motor provides for a two-man, side-by-side cockpit and a large payload compartment for a full infantry squad or mission equipment for other FCS variants.

Collaborative partnerships in research and development with industry, government and academia made FCS-W possible - the University of Delaware Center of Composite Materials supported low-cost composite materials and processing;

FCS-T was originally developed for the joint U.S./U.K. FSCS development program. The vehicle recently completed testing in the U.K. and returned to the U.S. FCS-T is C130 transportable at 16 tons and can be deployed directly to the battlefield in any terrain without preparation.





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