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Carbon Fibre/Fiber

Carbon fibre is produced by the controlled oxidation, carbonisation and graphitisation of carbon-rich organic precursors which are already in fibre form. The most common precursor is polyacrylonitrile (PAN), because it gives the best carbon fibre properties, but fibres can also be made from pitch or cellulose. Variation of the graphitisation process produces either high strength fibres (@ ~2,600°C) or high modulus fibres (@ ~3,000°C) with other types in between. Once formed, the carbon fibre has a surface treatment applied to improve matrix bonding and chemical sizing which serves to protect it during handling.

 

When carbon fibre was first produced in the late sixties the price for the basic high strength grade was about £200/kg. By 1996 the annual worldwide capacity had increased to about 7,000 tonnes and the price for the equivalent (high strength) grade was £15-40/kg. Carbon fibres are usually grouped according to the modulus band in which their properties fall. These bands are commonly referred to as: high strength (HS), intermediate modulus (IM), high modulus (HM) and ultra high modulus (UHM). The filament diameter of most types is about 5-7µm. Carbon fibre has the highest specific stiffness of any commercially available fibre, very high strength in both tension and compression and a high resistance to corrosion, creep and fatigue. Their impact strength, however, is lower than either glass or aramid, with particularly brittle characteristics being exhibited by HM and UHM fibres.


Published courtesy of David Cripps, Gurit

http://www.gurit.com